......................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 Members of the Alsaloum family, Syrian refugees, pass the time at a Days Inn in north Tampa on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. Just days before, they arrived on American soil from Turkey. Forced to flee their village located near Aleppo in 2011 when war broke out, they've been on the move ever since. Following more than two years of background checks and vetting in Turkey, the Alsaloums made it to Tampa the same week President Trump signed an executive order banning the entry of Syrian refugees. ( Full story for the Tampa Bay Times )

Members of the Alsaloum family, Syrian refugees, pass the time at a Days Inn in north Tampa on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. Just days before, they arrived on American soil from Turkey. Forced to flee their village located near Aleppo in 2011 when war broke out, they've been on the move ever since. Following more than two years of background checks and vetting in Turkey, the Alsaloums made it to Tampa the same week President Trump signed an executive order banning the entry of Syrian refugees. (Full story for the Tampa Bay Times)

 Momen Alsaloum, 22, sits in his father's wheelchair while holding son Amin, 3, at a Days Inn in north Tampa. Father and son kept an eye on the family's belongings while waiting for case manager Rana Al Sarraf to help them move to a temporary apartment.

Momen Alsaloum, 22, sits in his father's wheelchair while holding son Amin, 3, at a Days Inn in north Tampa. Father and son kept an eye on the family's belongings while waiting for case manager Rana Al Sarraf to help them move to a temporary apartment.

 Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, holds daughter Jamila, 2, in the doorway of their temporary apartment on the day they moved in. The family's resettlement case manager, Rana Al Sarraf (second from right) discusses the apartment's condition and temporary nature with Coptic Orthodox Charities executive director Amira Salama (in green) and Zeyad Abduljaber of sister organization Radiant Hands.

Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, holds daughter Jamila, 2, in the doorway of their temporary apartment on the day they moved in. The family's resettlement case manager, Rana Al Sarraf (second from right) discusses the apartment's condition and temporary nature with Coptic Orthodox Charities executive director Amira Salama (in green) and Zeyad Abduljaber of sister organization Radiant Hands.

 Kawthar Alsaloum (second from left), 23, helps brother-in-law Mohammed Alsaloum (right), 21, clean a fan while moving into a temporary apartment in Tampa. The space served as a temporary home for the Alsaloum family and got them out of the Days Inn, until the resettlement agency could find a more suitable longterm living situation. 

Kawthar Alsaloum (second from left), 23, helps brother-in-law Mohammed Alsaloum (right), 21, clean a fan while moving into a temporary apartment in Tampa. The space served as a temporary home for the Alsaloum family and got them out of the Days Inn, until the resettlement agency could find a more suitable longterm living situation. 

 Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, runs into the arms of father Amin Alsaloum, 27, after chasing him down the street. Amin was headed to a market a few blocks away, and Ahmad wanted to join. 

Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, runs into the arms of father Amin Alsaloum, 27, after chasing him down the street. Amin was headed to a market a few blocks away, and Ahmad wanted to join. 

 Jamila Alrazouk (left) hands grandson Riad Alsaloum, 1, to his grandfather and her husband, also named Riad Alsaloum, who plants a kiss on the toddler's cheek. After being released from the hospital for the first time, Riad Alsaloum was overjoyed to see his grandson upon arriving at the family's temporary apartment.

Jamila Alrazouk (left) hands grandson Riad Alsaloum, 1, to his grandfather and her husband, also named Riad Alsaloum, who plants a kiss on the toddler's cheek. After being released from the hospital for the first time, Riad Alsaloum was overjoyed to see his grandson upon arriving at the family's temporary apartment.

 The Alsaloums hangout in the waiting room of a pediatrician's office near their temporary apartment. They made the visit so the minors in the family could get immunizations. 

The Alsaloums hangout in the waiting room of a pediatrician's office near their temporary apartment. They made the visit so the minors in the family could get immunizations. 

 Riad Alsaloum is helped back inside by sons Abdalrahman Alsaloum (left), 16, and Momen Alsaloum, 22, after sitting outside their temporary apartment for some fresh air. The cancer attacking Riad Alsaloum's spine severely limited his mobility, making him reliant on family for even small movements. 

Riad Alsaloum is helped back inside by sons Abdalrahman Alsaloum (left), 16, and Momen Alsaloum, 22, after sitting outside their temporary apartment for some fresh air. The cancer attacking Riad Alsaloum's spine severely limited his mobility, making him reliant on family for even small movements. 

 Abdalrahman Alsaloum, 16, massages the feet of father Riad Alsaloum at the family's temporary apartment. During Riad Alsaloum's fight with cancer, his family did all they could to minimize his discomfort. 

Abdalrahman Alsaloum, 16, massages the feet of father Riad Alsaloum at the family's temporary apartment. During Riad Alsaloum's fight with cancer, his family did all they could to minimize his discomfort. 

 Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, explores the backyard of the family's temporary apartment beneath drying clothes. Despite stressful circumstances and frequent moves, the Alsaloum children spent much of their days playing. Their parents did everything in their means to shield the children from hardship. 

Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, explores the backyard of the family's temporary apartment beneath drying clothes. Despite stressful circumstances and frequent moves, the Alsaloum children spent much of their days playing. Their parents did everything in their means to shield the children from hardship. 

 Amin Alsaloum, 27, plays on the floor with daughter Jamila, 2, and son Ahmad, 4, in the family's temporary apartment. The Alsaloums fled Syria to find a new home safe from war, where their children could grow up with opportunities not possible under Bashar al-Assad's regime. 

Amin Alsaloum, 27, plays on the floor with daughter Jamila, 2, and son Ahmad, 4, in the family's temporary apartment. The Alsaloums fled Syria to find a new home safe from war, where their children could grow up with opportunities not possible under Bashar al-Assad's regime. 

 (From left) Nahed Kanj, 22, sister-in-law Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, and her son Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, get settled into their new apartment complex in Tampa. After bouncing from a Days Inn to a temporary apartment to this more permanent arrangement, the family's first month in the United States was a turbulent one. Rana Al Sarraf and Amira Salama of Coptic Orthodox Charities worked tirelessly to find three apartments close to one another in a good neighborhood, despite the growing challenge of convincing landlords to rent to refugees. 

(From left) Nahed Kanj, 22, sister-in-law Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, and her son Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, get settled into their new apartment complex in Tampa. After bouncing from a Days Inn to a temporary apartment to this more permanent arrangement, the family's first month in the United States was a turbulent one. Rana Al Sarraf and Amira Salama of Coptic Orthodox Charities worked tirelessly to find three apartments close to one another in a good neighborhood, despite the growing challenge of convincing landlords to rent to refugees. 

 Riad Alsaloum and wife Jamila Alrazouk wait for his release at Florida Hospital in Tampa. Riad Alsaloum's cancer bounced him back and forth between hospital and home repeatedly before his death. Jamila Alrazouk stayed by her husband's side day and night through every hospital stay. 

Riad Alsaloum and wife Jamila Alrazouk wait for his release at Florida Hospital in Tampa. Riad Alsaloum's cancer bounced him back and forth between hospital and home repeatedly before his death. Jamila Alrazouk stayed by her husband's side day and night through every hospital stay. 

 Mohammed Alsaloum, 21, works at a car wash in north Tampa. After some unsuccessful job hunting, Mohammed Alsaloum and his older brothers Amin and Momen found part-time work at the car wash. Without English skills or past employer references, finding work can prove challenging for refugees. Resettlement agencies like Coptic Orthodox Charities play a big role helping to find employment. 

Mohammed Alsaloum, 21, works at a car wash in north Tampa. After some unsuccessful job hunting, Mohammed Alsaloum and his older brothers Amin and Momen found part-time work at the car wash. Without English skills or past employer references, finding work can prove challenging for refugees. Resettlement agencies like Coptic Orthodox Charities play a big role helping to find employment. 

 Jamila Alrazouk prepares dinner for the family in her new apartment. With the help of Coptic Orthodox Charities, the Alsaloums eventually settled into three apartments all within walking distance of each other. 

Jamila Alrazouk prepares dinner for the family in her new apartment. With the help of Coptic Orthodox Charities, the Alsaloums eventually settled into three apartments all within walking distance of each other. 

 (From left) Marta Tudela, a CARIBE Refugee Program intake counselor, and resettlement case manager Rana Al Sarraf assist Nahed Kanj, 22, and sister-in-law Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, with applications for subsidized childcare at the CARIBE office in Tampa. Al Sarraf was instrumental in helping the Alsaloum family with tedious paperwork in the early months. 

(From left) Marta Tudela, a CARIBE Refugee Program intake counselor, and resettlement case manager Rana Al Sarraf assist Nahed Kanj, 22, and sister-in-law Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, with applications for subsidized childcare at the CARIBE office in Tampa. Al Sarraf was instrumental in helping the Alsaloum family with tedious paperwork in the early months. 

 Momen Alsaloum, 22, feeds son Riad, 1, as Riad's brother Amin, 3, vies for attention in one of the family's permanent apartments. Riad Alsaloum, weak from cancer, rests behind them.

Momen Alsaloum, 22, feeds son Riad, 1, as Riad's brother Amin, 3, vies for attention in one of the family's permanent apartments. Riad Alsaloum, weak from cancer, rests behind them.

 Momen Alsaloum, 22, participates in a vocabulary exercise on his first day of English class with the CARIBE Refugee Program in Tampa. Teacher Jose Similus (front) would name a body part, in this case "head," prompting his students to point to it on themselves.

Momen Alsaloum, 22, participates in a vocabulary exercise on his first day of English class with the CARIBE Refugee Program in Tampa. Teacher Jose Similus (front) would name a body part, in this case "head," prompting his students to point to it on themselves.

 Momen Alsaloum, 22, fills in blanks on a vocabulary worksheet during a human anatomy lesson in Jose Similus' CARIBE Refugee Program English class in Tampa. Alsaloum struggled on his first day, but classmates with more English under their belts helped him with answers. 

Momen Alsaloum, 22, fills in blanks on a vocabulary worksheet during a human anatomy lesson in Jose Similus' CARIBE Refugee Program English class in Tampa. Alsaloum struggled on his first day, but classmates with more English under their belts helped him with answers. 

 Riad Alsaloum rests on a mattress while wife Jamila Alrazouk keeps an eye on grandchildren Riad, 1, and Ahmad, 4, at Rowlett Park in Tampa. The Alsaloum family made the trip for a refugee picnic hosted by Coptic Orthodox Charities, their resettlement agency. As Riad Alsaloum's health deteriorated, it became increasingly difficult for his family to prevent discomfort for him. 

Riad Alsaloum rests on a mattress while wife Jamila Alrazouk keeps an eye on grandchildren Riad, 1, and Ahmad, 4, at Rowlett Park in Tampa. The Alsaloum family made the trip for a refugee picnic hosted by Coptic Orthodox Charities, their resettlement agency. As Riad Alsaloum's health deteriorated, it became increasingly difficult for his family to prevent discomfort for him. 

 Amin Alsaloum, 27, kisses the hand of his deceased father, Riad Alsaloum, after washing the body in Islamic tradition with his brothers at a Tampa funeral home. Riad Alsaloum's body was then placed in a casket and driven to a local mosque for prayer before burial. 

Amin Alsaloum, 27, kisses the hand of his deceased father, Riad Alsaloum, after washing the body in Islamic tradition with his brothers at a Tampa funeral home. Riad Alsaloum's body was then placed in a casket and driven to a local mosque for prayer before burial. 

 Amin Alsaloum (front), 27, carries his father's casket from hearse to grave with the help of brother Momen (second from left), 22, and members of their mosque community at a Tampa cemetery. Riad Alsaloum's body went from hospital to funeral home to mosque to cemetery in a matter of hours. Islamic funeral customs dictate that the deceased should be buried as soon as possible. 

Amin Alsaloum (front), 27, carries his father's casket from hearse to grave with the help of brother Momen (second from left), 22, and members of their mosque community at a Tampa cemetery. Riad Alsaloum's body went from hospital to funeral home to mosque to cemetery in a matter of hours. Islamic funeral customs dictate that the deceased should be buried as soon as possible. 

 The Alsaloum brothers and a few friends say their final goodbyes at Riad Alsaloum's grave following his burial in Tampa. At the conclusion of the burial service, those in attendance lined up and gave each of the four brothers a hug before departing. The Alsaloum brothers lingered after, overcome with emotion. 

The Alsaloum brothers and a few friends say their final goodbyes at Riad Alsaloum's grave following his burial in Tampa. At the conclusion of the burial service, those in attendance lined up and gave each of the four brothers a hug before departing. The Alsaloum brothers lingered after, overcome with emotion. 

 Amin Alsaloum (center, in blue plaid), 27, prays with fellow worshipers during Ramadan services at a mosque in Tampa on Thursday, June 15, 2017. Amin Alsaloum and brother Momen worked part-time at the mosque during the month of Ramadan, directing traffic at peak prayer hours. The mosque proved to be a welcoming community to the Alsaloum family. 

Amin Alsaloum (center, in blue plaid), 27, prays with fellow worshipers during Ramadan services at a mosque in Tampa on Thursday, June 15, 2017. Amin Alsaloum and brother Momen worked part-time at the mosque during the month of Ramadan, directing traffic at peak prayer hours. The mosque proved to be a welcoming community to the Alsaloum family. 

Members of the Alsaloum family, Syrian refugees, pass the time at a Days Inn in north Tampa on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. Just days before, they arrived on American soil from Turkey. Forced to flee their village located near Aleppo in 2011 when war broke out, they've been on the move ever since. Following more than two years of background checks and vetting in Turkey, the Alsaloums made it to Tampa the same week President Trump signed an executive order banning the entry of Syrian refugees. (Full story for the Tampa Bay Times)

Momen Alsaloum, 22, sits in his father's wheelchair while holding son Amin, 3, at a Days Inn in north Tampa. Father and son kept an eye on the family's belongings while waiting for case manager Rana Al Sarraf to help them move to a temporary apartment.

Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, holds daughter Jamila, 2, in the doorway of their temporary apartment on the day they moved in. The family's resettlement case manager, Rana Al Sarraf (second from right) discusses the apartment's condition and temporary nature with Coptic Orthodox Charities executive director Amira Salama (in green) and Zeyad Abduljaber of sister organization Radiant Hands.

Kawthar Alsaloum (second from left), 23, helps brother-in-law Mohammed Alsaloum (right), 21, clean a fan while moving into a temporary apartment in Tampa. The space served as a temporary home for the Alsaloum family and got them out of the Days Inn, until the resettlement agency could find a more suitable longterm living situation. 

Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, runs into the arms of father Amin Alsaloum, 27, after chasing him down the street. Amin was headed to a market a few blocks away, and Ahmad wanted to join. 

Jamila Alrazouk (left) hands grandson Riad Alsaloum, 1, to his grandfather and her husband, also named Riad Alsaloum, who plants a kiss on the toddler's cheek. After being released from the hospital for the first time, Riad Alsaloum was overjoyed to see his grandson upon arriving at the family's temporary apartment.

The Alsaloums hangout in the waiting room of a pediatrician's office near their temporary apartment. They made the visit so the minors in the family could get immunizations. 

Riad Alsaloum is helped back inside by sons Abdalrahman Alsaloum (left), 16, and Momen Alsaloum, 22, after sitting outside their temporary apartment for some fresh air. The cancer attacking Riad Alsaloum's spine severely limited his mobility, making him reliant on family for even small movements. 

Abdalrahman Alsaloum, 16, massages the feet of father Riad Alsaloum at the family's temporary apartment. During Riad Alsaloum's fight with cancer, his family did all they could to minimize his discomfort. 

Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, explores the backyard of the family's temporary apartment beneath drying clothes. Despite stressful circumstances and frequent moves, the Alsaloum children spent much of their days playing. Their parents did everything in their means to shield the children from hardship. 

Amin Alsaloum, 27, plays on the floor with daughter Jamila, 2, and son Ahmad, 4, in the family's temporary apartment. The Alsaloums fled Syria to find a new home safe from war, where their children could grow up with opportunities not possible under Bashar al-Assad's regime. 

(From left) Nahed Kanj, 22, sister-in-law Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, and her son Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, get settled into their new apartment complex in Tampa. After bouncing from a Days Inn to a temporary apartment to this more permanent arrangement, the family's first month in the United States was a turbulent one. Rana Al Sarraf and Amira Salama of Coptic Orthodox Charities worked tirelessly to find three apartments close to one another in a good neighborhood, despite the growing challenge of convincing landlords to rent to refugees. 

Riad Alsaloum and wife Jamila Alrazouk wait for his release at Florida Hospital in Tampa. Riad Alsaloum's cancer bounced him back and forth between hospital and home repeatedly before his death. Jamila Alrazouk stayed by her husband's side day and night through every hospital stay. 

Mohammed Alsaloum, 21, works at a car wash in north Tampa. After some unsuccessful job hunting, Mohammed Alsaloum and his older brothers Amin and Momen found part-time work at the car wash. Without English skills or past employer references, finding work can prove challenging for refugees. Resettlement agencies like Coptic Orthodox Charities play a big role helping to find employment. 

Jamila Alrazouk prepares dinner for the family in her new apartment. With the help of Coptic Orthodox Charities, the Alsaloums eventually settled into three apartments all within walking distance of each other. 

(From left) Marta Tudela, a CARIBE Refugee Program intake counselor, and resettlement case manager Rana Al Sarraf assist Nahed Kanj, 22, and sister-in-law Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, with applications for subsidized childcare at the CARIBE office in Tampa. Al Sarraf was instrumental in helping the Alsaloum family with tedious paperwork in the early months. 

Momen Alsaloum, 22, feeds son Riad, 1, as Riad's brother Amin, 3, vies for attention in one of the family's permanent apartments. Riad Alsaloum, weak from cancer, rests behind them.

Momen Alsaloum, 22, participates in a vocabulary exercise on his first day of English class with the CARIBE Refugee Program in Tampa. Teacher Jose Similus (front) would name a body part, in this case "head," prompting his students to point to it on themselves.

Momen Alsaloum, 22, fills in blanks on a vocabulary worksheet during a human anatomy lesson in Jose Similus' CARIBE Refugee Program English class in Tampa. Alsaloum struggled on his first day, but classmates with more English under their belts helped him with answers. 

Riad Alsaloum rests on a mattress while wife Jamila Alrazouk keeps an eye on grandchildren Riad, 1, and Ahmad, 4, at Rowlett Park in Tampa. The Alsaloum family made the trip for a refugee picnic hosted by Coptic Orthodox Charities, their resettlement agency. As Riad Alsaloum's health deteriorated, it became increasingly difficult for his family to prevent discomfort for him. 

Amin Alsaloum, 27, kisses the hand of his deceased father, Riad Alsaloum, after washing the body in Islamic tradition with his brothers at a Tampa funeral home. Riad Alsaloum's body was then placed in a casket and driven to a local mosque for prayer before burial. 

Amin Alsaloum (front), 27, carries his father's casket from hearse to grave with the help of brother Momen (second from left), 22, and members of their mosque community at a Tampa cemetery. Riad Alsaloum's body went from hospital to funeral home to mosque to cemetery in a matter of hours. Islamic funeral customs dictate that the deceased should be buried as soon as possible. 

The Alsaloum brothers and a few friends say their final goodbyes at Riad Alsaloum's grave following his burial in Tampa. At the conclusion of the burial service, those in attendance lined up and gave each of the four brothers a hug before departing. The Alsaloum brothers lingered after, overcome with emotion. 

Amin Alsaloum (center, in blue plaid), 27, prays with fellow worshipers during Ramadan services at a mosque in Tampa on Thursday, June 15, 2017. Amin Alsaloum and brother Momen worked part-time at the mosque during the month of Ramadan, directing traffic at peak prayer hours. The mosque proved to be a welcoming community to the Alsaloum family. 

 Members of the Alsaloum family, Syrian refugees, pass the time at a Days Inn in north Tampa on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. Just days before, they arrived on American soil from Turkey. Forced to flee their village located near Aleppo in 2011 when war broke out, they've been on the move ever since. Following more than two years of background checks and vetting in Turkey, the Alsaloums made it to Tampa the same week President Trump signed an executive order banning the entry of Syrian refugees. ( Full story for the Tampa Bay Times )
 Momen Alsaloum, 22, sits in his father's wheelchair while holding son Amin, 3, at a Days Inn in north Tampa. Father and son kept an eye on the family's belongings while waiting for case manager Rana Al Sarraf to help them move to a temporary apartment.
 Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, holds daughter Jamila, 2, in the doorway of their temporary apartment on the day they moved in. The family's resettlement case manager, Rana Al Sarraf (second from right) discusses the apartment's condition and temporary nature with Coptic Orthodox Charities executive director Amira Salama (in green) and Zeyad Abduljaber of sister organization Radiant Hands.
 Kawthar Alsaloum (second from left), 23, helps brother-in-law Mohammed Alsaloum (right), 21, clean a fan while moving into a temporary apartment in Tampa. The space served as a temporary home for the Alsaloum family and got them out of the Days Inn, until the resettlement agency could find a more suitable longterm living situation. 
 Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, runs into the arms of father Amin Alsaloum, 27, after chasing him down the street. Amin was headed to a market a few blocks away, and Ahmad wanted to join. 
 Jamila Alrazouk (left) hands grandson Riad Alsaloum, 1, to his grandfather and her husband, also named Riad Alsaloum, who plants a kiss on the toddler's cheek. After being released from the hospital for the first time, Riad Alsaloum was overjoyed to see his grandson upon arriving at the family's temporary apartment.
 The Alsaloums hangout in the waiting room of a pediatrician's office near their temporary apartment. They made the visit so the minors in the family could get immunizations. 
 Riad Alsaloum is helped back inside by sons Abdalrahman Alsaloum (left), 16, and Momen Alsaloum, 22, after sitting outside their temporary apartment for some fresh air. The cancer attacking Riad Alsaloum's spine severely limited his mobility, making him reliant on family for even small movements. 
 Abdalrahman Alsaloum, 16, massages the feet of father Riad Alsaloum at the family's temporary apartment. During Riad Alsaloum's fight with cancer, his family did all they could to minimize his discomfort. 
 Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, explores the backyard of the family's temporary apartment beneath drying clothes. Despite stressful circumstances and frequent moves, the Alsaloum children spent much of their days playing. Their parents did everything in their means to shield the children from hardship. 
 Amin Alsaloum, 27, plays on the floor with daughter Jamila, 2, and son Ahmad, 4, in the family's temporary apartment. The Alsaloums fled Syria to find a new home safe from war, where their children could grow up with opportunities not possible under Bashar al-Assad's regime. 
 (From left) Nahed Kanj, 22, sister-in-law Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, and her son Ahmad Alsaloum, 4, get settled into their new apartment complex in Tampa. After bouncing from a Days Inn to a temporary apartment to this more permanent arrangement, the family's first month in the United States was a turbulent one. Rana Al Sarraf and Amira Salama of Coptic Orthodox Charities worked tirelessly to find three apartments close to one another in a good neighborhood, despite the growing challenge of convincing landlords to rent to refugees. 
 Riad Alsaloum and wife Jamila Alrazouk wait for his release at Florida Hospital in Tampa. Riad Alsaloum's cancer bounced him back and forth between hospital and home repeatedly before his death. Jamila Alrazouk stayed by her husband's side day and night through every hospital stay. 
 Mohammed Alsaloum, 21, works at a car wash in north Tampa. After some unsuccessful job hunting, Mohammed Alsaloum and his older brothers Amin and Momen found part-time work at the car wash. Without English skills or past employer references, finding work can prove challenging for refugees. Resettlement agencies like Coptic Orthodox Charities play a big role helping to find employment. 
 Jamila Alrazouk prepares dinner for the family in her new apartment. With the help of Coptic Orthodox Charities, the Alsaloums eventually settled into three apartments all within walking distance of each other. 
 (From left) Marta Tudela, a CARIBE Refugee Program intake counselor, and resettlement case manager Rana Al Sarraf assist Nahed Kanj, 22, and sister-in-law Kawthar Alsaloum, 23, with applications for subsidized childcare at the CARIBE office in Tampa. Al Sarraf was instrumental in helping the Alsaloum family with tedious paperwork in the early months. 
 Momen Alsaloum, 22, feeds son Riad, 1, as Riad's brother Amin, 3, vies for attention in one of the family's permanent apartments. Riad Alsaloum, weak from cancer, rests behind them.
 Momen Alsaloum, 22, participates in a vocabulary exercise on his first day of English class with the CARIBE Refugee Program in Tampa. Teacher Jose Similus (front) would name a body part, in this case "head," prompting his students to point to it on themselves.
 Momen Alsaloum, 22, fills in blanks on a vocabulary worksheet during a human anatomy lesson in Jose Similus' CARIBE Refugee Program English class in Tampa. Alsaloum struggled on his first day, but classmates with more English under their belts helped him with answers. 
 Riad Alsaloum rests on a mattress while wife Jamila Alrazouk keeps an eye on grandchildren Riad, 1, and Ahmad, 4, at Rowlett Park in Tampa. The Alsaloum family made the trip for a refugee picnic hosted by Coptic Orthodox Charities, their resettlement agency. As Riad Alsaloum's health deteriorated, it became increasingly difficult for his family to prevent discomfort for him. 
 Amin Alsaloum, 27, kisses the hand of his deceased father, Riad Alsaloum, after washing the body in Islamic tradition with his brothers at a Tampa funeral home. Riad Alsaloum's body was then placed in a casket and driven to a local mosque for prayer before burial. 
 Amin Alsaloum (front), 27, carries his father's casket from hearse to grave with the help of brother Momen (second from left), 22, and members of their mosque community at a Tampa cemetery. Riad Alsaloum's body went from hospital to funeral home to mosque to cemetery in a matter of hours. Islamic funeral customs dictate that the deceased should be buried as soon as possible. 
 The Alsaloum brothers and a few friends say their final goodbyes at Riad Alsaloum's grave following his burial in Tampa. At the conclusion of the burial service, those in attendance lined up and gave each of the four brothers a hug before departing. The Alsaloum brothers lingered after, overcome with emotion. 
 Amin Alsaloum (center, in blue plaid), 27, prays with fellow worshipers during Ramadan services at a mosque in Tampa on Thursday, June 15, 2017. Amin Alsaloum and brother Momen worked part-time at the mosque during the month of Ramadan, directing traffic at peak prayer hours. The mosque proved to be a welcoming community to the Alsaloum family.