......................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 Keith Spike’s story is one of redemption. Spike has been locked up more than twenty times. He is deeply entrenched in a cycle of incarceration. During this latest stint—nine months for drug possession and probation violation—Spike took a parenting class. He has a 6-year-old daughter, Carolyn, who cries at night without him. Spike used to spend his sentences scheming how to go about his business doing and selling drugs without getting caught again, he says. This time though, he wants a real fresh start, for Carolyn. ( Full story for the Tampa Bay Times )  Above: Keith Spike (center) reacts to holding a mannequin baby during a lesson on how to properly cradle an infant. Seen to his left is classmate Williams Harvey and to his right Salvador Sanchez Jr.

Keith Spike’s story is one of redemption. Spike has been locked up more than twenty times. He is deeply entrenched in a cycle of incarceration. During this latest stint—nine months for drug possession and probation violation—Spike took a parenting class. He has a 6-year-old daughter, Carolyn, who cries at night without him. Spike used to spend his sentences scheming how to go about his business doing and selling drugs without getting caught again, he says. This time though, he wants a real fresh start, for Carolyn. (Full story for the Tampa Bay Times)

Above: Keith Spike (center) reacts to holding a mannequin baby during a lesson on how to properly cradle an infant. Seen to his left is classmate Williams Harvey and to his right Salvador Sanchez Jr.

 Keith Spike becomes emotional while opening up about his daughter, Carolyn, during a parenting class at Falkenburg Road Jail in Tampa, Fla. Spike calls her his pride and joy, saying she's his motivation for attending the course. “I don't consider myself a great dad no more,” he says. “I consider myself just a father.”  At 6, Carolyn is chatty and proud, eager to show her father the latest dance she learned at church. Spike’s wife brings her most weekends. Father and daughter catch up via video at Falkenburg Road Jail, one of hundreds across the country that has replaced face-to-face and through-the-glass visits with video conferencing. There are no hugs or kisses.

Keith Spike becomes emotional while opening up about his daughter, Carolyn, during a parenting class at Falkenburg Road Jail in Tampa, Fla. Spike calls her his pride and joy, saying she's his motivation for attending the course. “I don't consider myself a great dad no more,” he says. “I consider myself just a father.”

At 6, Carolyn is chatty and proud, eager to show her father the latest dance she learned at church. Spike’s wife brings her most weekends. Father and daughter catch up via video at Falkenburg Road Jail, one of hundreds across the country that has replaced face-to-face and through-the-glass visits with video conferencing. There are no hugs or kisses.

 Keith Spike (right) and his classmates walk through Falkenburg Road Jail after completion of the day's parenting class. Spike, 32, is one of 13 incarcerated men in counselor Jesse White’s course at the jail. Some are court-ordered to be there. Others sign up in hopes of helping their cases in ongoing custody battles. Spike is one of the willing — the handful who thought it might pass the time, perhaps even teach them something.

Keith Spike (right) and his classmates walk through Falkenburg Road Jail after completion of the day's parenting class. Spike, 32, is one of 13 incarcerated men in counselor Jesse White’s course at the jail. Some are court-ordered to be there. Others sign up in hopes of helping their cases in ongoing custody battles. Spike is one of the willing — the handful who thought it might pass the time, perhaps even teach them something.

 Keith Spike sits next to pictures of his wife, Elexxia, on his bed at Falkenburg Road Jail. In Spike’s hand is a folder of class materials from the parenting and substance abuse courses he attends. The men are assigned homework to complete in their living quarters between classes.

Keith Spike sits next to pictures of his wife, Elexxia, on his bed at Falkenburg Road Jail. In Spike’s hand is a folder of class materials from the parenting and substance abuse courses he attends. The men are assigned homework to complete in their living quarters between classes.

 Keith Spike (left), seen in the recreation yard, reflects on almost nine months spent behind bars while a fellow inmate teases him from inside their living quarters.

Keith Spike (left), seen in the recreation yard, reflects on almost nine months spent behind bars while a fellow inmate teases him from inside their living quarters.

 Keith Spike (second from left) and his classmates listen as counselor Jesse White lectures on separation and loss, in regard to the effect that incarceration has on a child, during a parenting class at Falkenburg Road Jail.   “It’s my first time missing Christmas with my daughter—that’s unexplainable,” Keith Spike said to the class. 

Keith Spike (second from left) and his classmates listen as counselor Jesse White lectures on separation and loss, in regard to the effect that incarceration has on a child, during a parenting class at Falkenburg Road Jail. 

“It’s my first time missing Christmas with my daughter—that’s unexplainable,” Keith Spike said to the class. 

 Keith Spike takes an emotional moment to himself after the class watched a video on healing parent-child relationships broken by incarceration. Counselor Jesse White encourages his students to start the process well before they are released, with letters and visitation sessions.

Keith Spike takes an emotional moment to himself after the class watched a video on healing parent-child relationships broken by incarceration. Counselor Jesse White encourages his students to start the process well before they are released, with letters and visitation sessions.

 Keith Spike stops on his way to the door to tell counselor Jesse White that the day's discussion really resonated with him. For White, developing a close rapport with students is essential to catalyzing change in their lives.

Keith Spike stops on his way to the door to tell counselor Jesse White that the day's discussion really resonated with him. For White, developing a close rapport with students is essential to catalyzing change in their lives.

 On his final day before release, Keith Spike gets a touch-up from a fellow inmate in their living quarters at Falkenburg Road Jail. Spike wanted to look fresh for his wife and daughter, who hadn't seen him in person since before the start of his sentence.

On his final day before release, Keith Spike gets a touch-up from a fellow inmate in their living quarters at Falkenburg Road Jail. Spike wanted to look fresh for his wife and daughter, who hadn't seen him in person since before the start of his sentence.

 On his release day at Orient Road Jail in Tampa, Fla., the county facility from which inmates are discharged, Keith Spike pulls from a bag the clothes he was wearing when arrested for ecstasy possession and probation violation nine months prior.

On his release day at Orient Road Jail in Tampa, Fla., the county facility from which inmates are discharged, Keith Spike pulls from a bag the clothes he was wearing when arrested for ecstasy possession and probation violation nine months prior.

 Keith Spike carries his daughter Carolyn, 6, after picking her up early from school with wife Elexxia on his release day. Elexxia waited at the jail to greet her husband when he walked out, and shortly after the two headed for Carolyn's elementary school. 

Keith Spike carries his daughter Carolyn, 6, after picking her up early from school with wife Elexxia on his release day. Elexxia waited at the jail to greet her husband when he walked out, and shortly after the two headed for Carolyn's elementary school. 

 Carolyn Spike smiles as her dad holds her during a walk through the Ybor City neighborhood of Tampa on his first day out of jail. "It's not too late—because my daughter, she still young—I still got a chance to make up," he says.

Carolyn Spike smiles as her dad holds her during a walk through the Ybor City neighborhood of Tampa on his first day out of jail. "It's not too late—because my daughter, she still young—I still got a chance to make up," he says.

 Keith Spike holds Carolyn in front of his sister-in-law’s house in Tampa, while his nieces play around them. Spike, his wife and daughter stayed at this home following his release. Carolyn stayed with her birth mother while Spike was in jail, and Elexxia bounced around without finding a stable place for her husband and step-daughter to move into. Upon Spike’s release, the three became a family unit and relied on loved ones to house them until they could find their own place.  

Keith Spike holds Carolyn in front of his sister-in-law’s house in Tampa, while his nieces play around them. Spike, his wife and daughter stayed at this home following his release. Carolyn stayed with her birth mother while Spike was in jail, and Elexxia bounced around without finding a stable place for her husband and step-daughter to move into. Upon Spike’s release, the three became a family unit and relied on loved ones to house them until they could find their own place.  

Keith Spike’s story is one of redemption. Spike has been locked up more than twenty times. He is deeply entrenched in a cycle of incarceration. During this latest stint—nine months for drug possession and probation violation—Spike took a parenting class. He has a 6-year-old daughter, Carolyn, who cries at night without him. Spike used to spend his sentences scheming how to go about his business doing and selling drugs without getting caught again, he says. This time though, he wants a real fresh start, for Carolyn. (Full story for the Tampa Bay Times)

Above: Keith Spike (center) reacts to holding a mannequin baby during a lesson on how to properly cradle an infant. Seen to his left is classmate Williams Harvey and to his right Salvador Sanchez Jr.

Keith Spike becomes emotional while opening up about his daughter, Carolyn, during a parenting class at Falkenburg Road Jail in Tampa, Fla. Spike calls her his pride and joy, saying she's his motivation for attending the course. “I don't consider myself a great dad no more,” he says. “I consider myself just a father.”

At 6, Carolyn is chatty and proud, eager to show her father the latest dance she learned at church. Spike’s wife brings her most weekends. Father and daughter catch up via video at Falkenburg Road Jail, one of hundreds across the country that has replaced face-to-face and through-the-glass visits with video conferencing. There are no hugs or kisses.

Keith Spike (right) and his classmates walk through Falkenburg Road Jail after completion of the day's parenting class. Spike, 32, is one of 13 incarcerated men in counselor Jesse White’s course at the jail. Some are court-ordered to be there. Others sign up in hopes of helping their cases in ongoing custody battles. Spike is one of the willing — the handful who thought it might pass the time, perhaps even teach them something.

Keith Spike sits next to pictures of his wife, Elexxia, on his bed at Falkenburg Road Jail. In Spike’s hand is a folder of class materials from the parenting and substance abuse courses he attends. The men are assigned homework to complete in their living quarters between classes.

Keith Spike (left), seen in the recreation yard, reflects on almost nine months spent behind bars while a fellow inmate teases him from inside their living quarters.

Keith Spike (second from left) and his classmates listen as counselor Jesse White lectures on separation and loss, in regard to the effect that incarceration has on a child, during a parenting class at Falkenburg Road Jail. 

“It’s my first time missing Christmas with my daughter—that’s unexplainable,” Keith Spike said to the class. 

Keith Spike takes an emotional moment to himself after the class watched a video on healing parent-child relationships broken by incarceration. Counselor Jesse White encourages his students to start the process well before they are released, with letters and visitation sessions.

Keith Spike stops on his way to the door to tell counselor Jesse White that the day's discussion really resonated with him. For White, developing a close rapport with students is essential to catalyzing change in their lives.

On his final day before release, Keith Spike gets a touch-up from a fellow inmate in their living quarters at Falkenburg Road Jail. Spike wanted to look fresh for his wife and daughter, who hadn't seen him in person since before the start of his sentence.

On his release day at Orient Road Jail in Tampa, Fla., the county facility from which inmates are discharged, Keith Spike pulls from a bag the clothes he was wearing when arrested for ecstasy possession and probation violation nine months prior.

Keith Spike carries his daughter Carolyn, 6, after picking her up early from school with wife Elexxia on his release day. Elexxia waited at the jail to greet her husband when he walked out, and shortly after the two headed for Carolyn's elementary school. 

Carolyn Spike smiles as her dad holds her during a walk through the Ybor City neighborhood of Tampa on his first day out of jail. "It's not too late—because my daughter, she still young—I still got a chance to make up," he says.

Keith Spike holds Carolyn in front of his sister-in-law’s house in Tampa, while his nieces play around them. Spike, his wife and daughter stayed at this home following his release. Carolyn stayed with her birth mother while Spike was in jail, and Elexxia bounced around without finding a stable place for her husband and step-daughter to move into. Upon Spike’s release, the three became a family unit and relied on loved ones to house them until they could find their own place.  

 Keith Spike’s story is one of redemption. Spike has been locked up more than twenty times. He is deeply entrenched in a cycle of incarceration. During this latest stint—nine months for drug possession and probation violation—Spike took a parenting class. He has a 6-year-old daughter, Carolyn, who cries at night without him. Spike used to spend his sentences scheming how to go about his business doing and selling drugs without getting caught again, he says. This time though, he wants a real fresh start, for Carolyn. ( Full story for the Tampa Bay Times )  Above: Keith Spike (center) reacts to holding a mannequin baby during a lesson on how to properly cradle an infant. Seen to his left is classmate Williams Harvey and to his right Salvador Sanchez Jr.
 Keith Spike becomes emotional while opening up about his daughter, Carolyn, during a parenting class at Falkenburg Road Jail in Tampa, Fla. Spike calls her his pride and joy, saying she's his motivation for attending the course. “I don't consider myself a great dad no more,” he says. “I consider myself just a father.”  At 6, Carolyn is chatty and proud, eager to show her father the latest dance she learned at church. Spike’s wife brings her most weekends. Father and daughter catch up via video at Falkenburg Road Jail, one of hundreds across the country that has replaced face-to-face and through-the-glass visits with video conferencing. There are no hugs or kisses.
 Keith Spike (right) and his classmates walk through Falkenburg Road Jail after completion of the day's parenting class. Spike, 32, is one of 13 incarcerated men in counselor Jesse White’s course at the jail. Some are court-ordered to be there. Others sign up in hopes of helping their cases in ongoing custody battles. Spike is one of the willing — the handful who thought it might pass the time, perhaps even teach them something.
 Keith Spike sits next to pictures of his wife, Elexxia, on his bed at Falkenburg Road Jail. In Spike’s hand is a folder of class materials from the parenting and substance abuse courses he attends. The men are assigned homework to complete in their living quarters between classes.
 Keith Spike (left), seen in the recreation yard, reflects on almost nine months spent behind bars while a fellow inmate teases him from inside their living quarters.
 Keith Spike (second from left) and his classmates listen as counselor Jesse White lectures on separation and loss, in regard to the effect that incarceration has on a child, during a parenting class at Falkenburg Road Jail.   “It’s my first time missing Christmas with my daughter—that’s unexplainable,” Keith Spike said to the class. 
 Keith Spike takes an emotional moment to himself after the class watched a video on healing parent-child relationships broken by incarceration. Counselor Jesse White encourages his students to start the process well before they are released, with letters and visitation sessions.
 Keith Spike stops on his way to the door to tell counselor Jesse White that the day's discussion really resonated with him. For White, developing a close rapport with students is essential to catalyzing change in their lives.
 On his final day before release, Keith Spike gets a touch-up from a fellow inmate in their living quarters at Falkenburg Road Jail. Spike wanted to look fresh for his wife and daughter, who hadn't seen him in person since before the start of his sentence.
 On his release day at Orient Road Jail in Tampa, Fla., the county facility from which inmates are discharged, Keith Spike pulls from a bag the clothes he was wearing when arrested for ecstasy possession and probation violation nine months prior.
 Keith Spike carries his daughter Carolyn, 6, after picking her up early from school with wife Elexxia on his release day. Elexxia waited at the jail to greet her husband when he walked out, and shortly after the two headed for Carolyn's elementary school. 
 Carolyn Spike smiles as her dad holds her during a walk through the Ybor City neighborhood of Tampa on his first day out of jail. "It's not too late—because my daughter, she still young—I still got a chance to make up," he says.
 Keith Spike holds Carolyn in front of his sister-in-law’s house in Tampa, while his nieces play around them. Spike, his wife and daughter stayed at this home following his release. Carolyn stayed with her birth mother while Spike was in jail, and Elexxia bounced around without finding a stable place for her husband and step-daughter to move into. Upon Spike’s release, the three became a family unit and relied on loved ones to house them until they could find their own place.